Thursday Review: “‘Spanish Flu’: When Infectious Disease Names Blur Origins and Stigmatize Those Infected”

As important as any given fact is, it may be more important to notice what we’re being asked to do with the information. In the American Journal of Public Health, Trevor Hoppe uses the simple fact that there is nothing inherently Spanish about the “Spanish flu” to talk about the rhetoric of naming diseases. It […]

Thursday Review: “Better Prepare Than React: Reordering Public Health Priorities 100 Years After the Spanish Flu Epidemic”

This article is (you’ll pardon the reference) The Sixth Sense of pandemic scholarship. Michael Greenberger writes a series of painfully accurate observations in the 2018 American Journal of Public Health. The statistics, facts, and warnings in the first half of the piece read like a checklist of things that have gone wrong to lead up […]

Thursday Review: “When Physicians and Patients Think Alike: Patient-Centered Beliefs and Their Impact on Satisfaction and Trust”

Patient-centered medicine is important for patients and physicians alike. Patients help steer the treatment and care they receive. Physicians are relieved from the burden of having to be godlike guardians of life and death. Both are able to dialogue about what the best course of action might be for this particular patient. Yet in spite […]

Thursday Review: “Patients as Story-Tellers of Healthcare Journeys”

Klay Lamprell and Jeffrey Braithwaite use one of my favorite words when talking about stories: “structure”. Writing in Medical Humanities, the authors discuss two complimentary ways to help patients express their own story. The first is a structural approach, and the second is more character-driven. The purpose of the article is to bring these techniques […]

Thursday Review: “Suffering and the Goals of Medicine”

We have a consciously dualistic view of ourselves. The mind and the body are separate things. One is subjective, the other is objective. One is a source of psychological “suffering” and the other is a source of biomedical “pain”. If this is true, how can healthcare professionals—specifically those in medical fields—have any responsibility to their […]

Thursday Review: “The Nurse and the Use of Narrative: An Approach to Caring.”

How do we understand our own illness, and how does it affect us? When a patient is ill, how can healthcare professionals—especially nurses—help shape a positive understanding of what is happening? In the Journal of Psychiatric and Mental Health Nursing, J. A. Aloi discusses techniques to help patients edit their own story. Although focused on mental health, […]

Thursday Review: “Physician and Nursing Perceptions Concerning Interprofessional Communication and Collaboration”

There is no single profession which can meet all patients’ needs, Vasiliki Matziou et al. begin. The authors later explain it’s quite the opposite: when healthcare professionals collaborate, there are better health outcomes, higher patient satisfaction, and lower costs.1, 2 This much is known, but what influences how well nurses and physicians communicate? What exactly […]

Thursday Review: “Reducing Hospital Readmission Rates: Current Strategies and Future Directions”

In 2012, Burke et al. published an article describing an ideal process to transition patients from hospital care and avoid readmission. About a year later, two of the four authors of that paper, Dr. Sunil Kripalani and Dr. Eduard E. Vasilevskis, together with Dr. Cecelia N. Theobald and Beth Anctil, published a follow-up in the […]