Thursday Review: “Gesundheit und Krankheit als Bildungsprozess”, Health and Sickness as an Educational Process

A little more than a decade ago, there was a growing sense that the patient was missing from their own care. In Europe, the German-language Journal for Qualitative Education, Counseling, and Social Research called the idea of bringing patients’ biographies into academic study weitgehend brachliegend, “extensively fruitful”. In the US, Rita Charon published her groundbreaking book Narrative Medicine just over a year later.
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Thursday Review: “Patients’ unvoiced agendas in general practice consultations: qualitative study”

In the discussions about how to bring the humanities into medicine, one essential feature often gets lost. The attempts to make care more human and more humane aren’t being done for the sake of warm fuzzies. There are concrete ways medical outcomes suffer when healthcare practitioners and patients aren’t communicating well.

Writing in The BMJ, Christine A. Barry, et al. provide one of the clearest discussions on medical outcomes suffering from ineffective communication, and why both patients and doctors are hesitant to change communication for the better.
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Thursday Review: “Relationships of power: implications for interprofessional education”

Teaching health care providers how to collaborate between disciplines is considered an important mechanism for enhancing communication and interprofessional practice (IPP) among professionals, optimizing staff participation in clinical decision making, and improving the delivery of patient care1, 2, write Lindsay Baker, Eileen Egan-Lee, Maria Athina “Tina” Martimianakis and Scott Reeves.

Their article in the Journal of Interprofessional Care answers a big, glaring question: if there are such big advantages to “interprofessional practice”, why can it be so difficult to get professionals in different areas to collaborate?
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