Thursday Review: “Medical Humanities: Some Uses and Problems”

It’s been said that according to TV, there are only two interesting professions: law enforcement and medicine. Police dramas, mysteries, procedurals, and courtroom shows are nearly limitless. On the other hand, medical shows ranging from melodrama to comedy to documentary are easy to come by. The commercial success and wide range of even fictional stories about medicine points to an important discussion about the intersection of patient care and the humanities.
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Thursday Review: “Suffering and the Goals of Medicine”

We have a consciously dualistic view of ourselves. The mind and the body are separate things. One is subjective, the other is objective. One is a source of psychological “suffering” and the other is a source of biomedical “pain”.

If this is true, how can healthcare professionals—specifically those in medical fields—have any responsibility to their patients as human beings, and not just as complicated biomedical machinery?

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Thursday Review: “Can the Future of Medicine Be Saved from the Success of Science?”

The title of Dr. Samuel LeBaron’s article is intriguing enough. The fact that the author quotes three separate poems in a journal called Academic Medicine makes it even more alluring.

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