Thursday Review: “Integrating Narrative Medicine into Clinical Care”

This week’s review centers around a brief but meaningful summary of a 2016 pilot to integrate Narrative Medicine into medical students’ clinical rotations.

So far, most Thursday Reviews have tried to discover how the authors’ findings support and expand the use of storytelling in medicine. This week, I’d like to do something a little different. I’d like to work through the paper and ask questions along the way.
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Thursday Review: “Challenges to physician-patient communication about medication use”

Do Patients Actually Take Their Medications?

There is a growing drive to move healthcare, specifically the doctor-patient relationship, from a “benevolent paternalism”1, 2 to a system where patient and physician co-create a treatment plan which gives the patient both the best health outcome and the best quality of life.

By most indications, that drive to make patients collaborators in their own care has been superficial at best.3 For example, with regards to medication use, the preferred language has shifted from the right-and-wrong, black-and-white “compliant” towards the gentler connotation of “adherent”. The focus on patient-centered care again moved the language of medication to “concordant”, something agreed upon by both patient and physician.
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