Thursday Review: “Better Prepare Than React: Reordering Public Health Priorities 100 Years After the Spanish Flu Epidemic”

This article is (you’ll pardon the reference) The Sixth Sense of pandemic scholarship.

Michael Greenberger writes a series of painfully accurate observations in the 2018 American Journal of Public Health. The statistics, facts, and warnings in the first half of the piece read like a checklist of things that have gone wrong to lead up to the COVID-19 crisis. The twist no one sees coming is that when Greenberger gets to an individual’s narrative during the 2014 Ebola outbreak, the problem is exactly the opposite of what the world faces in 2020.
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Thursday Review: “Do Trained Nurses … Work for Love, or Do They Work for Money?”

It’s been several years since my own near-fatal health scare. In the time between now and then, I’ve often reflected on how, no matter how I felt about the physicians in charge, I always implicitly trusted the nurses. I had doctors who must have hidden their halo somewhere, and I had doctors whose degree I swear was written on the back of a greasy diner’s paper placemat. I can’t say, though, that I ever thought that the nurse taking care of me had anything other than the best for me in mind.

It was sobering, then, when Ellen D. Baer opened her speech-turned-article “‘Do Trained Nurses … Work for Love, or Do They Work for Money?’ Nursing and Altruism in the Twenty-First Century” like this:
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