Thursday Review: “The Long-Term Impact Of A Comprehensive Scholarly Concentration Program In Biomedical Ethics And Medical Humanities”

The authors admit that their article is a first step, but it’s an important first step to take. Writing in BMC Medical Education, Liu and coauthors set out to determine whether biomedical ethics and medical humanities education have any lasting impact on physicians.

Thursday Review: “The Almost Right Word: The Move From Medical to Health Humanities”

Jones et al. start their article with not-so-subtle nod to academic manifestos trying to rename entire disciplines. A clinician friend of one of the authors listened intently to the reasons behind shifting “medical humanities” to “health humanities”. He then replied, Oh, the things you academics worry about… The authors list the good reasons for shifting […]

Thursday Review: “Beyond ‘Dr. Feel-Good’: A Role for the Humanities in Medical Education”

As Dr. Arno K. Kumagai confirms in Academic Medicine, there’s a growing interest in the arts and humanities as a part of medical education. This curriculum, though, is still in its infancy. We know this because faculty and students alike don’t quite know what to do with the humanities.

Thursday Review: “Narrative and the Self as Relationship” (Parts V and VI)

Emotion is another one of the personal elements that is completely unintelligible, unless it’s placed in a narrative context. Emotion is not a biological certainty, or necessarily determined by culture. Emotion is a reaction to a turn in a person’s narrative which prompts them to some kind of response in relation to other people. In Gergen and Gergen’s words, emotion is a transient social role.

Thursday Review: “Narrative and the Self as Relationship” (Parts III and IV)

All of us feel we have “priority in self-definition”, in other words, we all get to tell our own story first. These stories are important tools we use to navigate through the world, and when those stories clash with how we fit into others’ stories, even in a medical context, the results can be personally devastating.

New Year’s Day 2021

Now that 2020 is officially a matter for historians, it’s worth reflecting that we’ve seen two general reactions to the year’s passing. The first is “good riddance”, and the second is the sober realization that 2020 is gone, but everything else that made it a difficult year—COVID included—is still with us.

Thursday Review: “Narrative and the Self as Relationship” (Parts I and II)

At first glance, calling a story a “form of accounting” seems awfully mundane. On the other hand, it’s very descriptive. The accounting for/of the activity is not the actual activity: it’s a kind of summary, a high-level overview of everything which actually occurred. A little like a financial report, everything in this account has a […]