New Year’s Day 2021

Now that 2020 is officially a matter for historians, it’s worth reflecting that we’ve seen two general reactions to the year’s passing. The first is “good riddance”, and the second is the sober realization that 2020 is gone, but everything else that made it a difficult year—COVID included—is still with us.

Thursday Review: “Narrative and the Self as Relationship” (Parts I and II)

At first glance, calling a story a “form of accounting” seems awfully mundane. On the other hand, it’s very descriptive. The accounting for/of the activity is not the actual activity: it’s a kind of summary, a high-level overview of everything which actually occurred. A little like a financial report, everything in this account has a […]

Thursday Review: “The Power of Story: Narrative Inquiry as a Methodology in Nursing Research”

The advancement of knowledge in the natural sciences has an ideal form. Every secondary school curriculum includes lessons about the scientific method. The authors Wang and Geale remind us that that nursing specifically, and healthcare generally, is what happens when the advancement of this knowledge meets real people. Healthcare is full of dynamic processes characterized […]

Thursday Review: “History in a Crisis — Lessons for Covid-19”

There’s an everyday meaning and a technical meaning to the word “crisis”. There’s the usual meaning of a difficult or intense moment. On the other hand, the “crisis” in a story is when a climax becomes unavoidable. In other words, if a story reaches a crisis, there’s no walking away: when the story is over, […]

Thursday Review: “Medical Humanities: Some Uses and Problems”

It’s been said that according to TV, there are only two interesting professions: law enforcement and medicine. Police dramas, mysteries, procedurals, and courtroom shows are nearly limitless. On the other hand, medical shows ranging from melodrama to comedy to documentary are easy to come by. The commercial success and wide range of even fictional stories […]

Thursday Review: “‘Spanish Flu’: When Infectious Disease Names Blur Origins and Stigmatize Those Infected”

As important as any given fact is, it may be more important to notice what we’re being asked to do with the information. In the American Journal of Public Health, Trevor Hoppe uses the simple fact that there is nothing inherently Spanish about the “Spanish flu” to talk about the rhetoric of naming diseases. It […]

Thursday Review: “Better Prepare Than React: Reordering Public Health Priorities 100 Years After the Spanish Flu Epidemic”

This article is (you’ll pardon the reference) The Sixth Sense of pandemic scholarship. Michael Greenberger writes a series of painfully accurate observations in the 2018 American Journal of Public Health. The statistics, facts, and warnings in the first half of the piece read like a checklist of things that have gone wrong to lead up […]

Story-in-Place, April 11, 2020

Story-in-Place is a workshop to give healthcare providers a forum tell their stories during the COVID-19 crisis. The session will be online on April 11, 2020 at 2pm Pacific. Registration is free. We’re living through a crisis and a profound shared experience. Healthcare providers and related fields are on the front lines. One of the […]