Thursday Review: “The Long-Term Impact Of A Comprehensive Scholarly Concentration Program In Biomedical Ethics And Medical Humanities”

The authors admit that their article is a first step, but it’s an important first step to take. Writing in BMC Medical Education, Liu and coauthors set out to determine whether biomedical ethics and medical humanities education have any lasting impact on physicians.

Thursday Review: “The Almost Right Word: The Move From Medical to Health Humanities”

Jones et al. start their article with not-so-subtle nod to academic manifestos trying to rename entire disciplines. A clinician friend of one of the authors listened intently to the reasons behind shifting “medical humanities” to “health humanities”. He then replied, Oh, the things you academics worry about… The authors list the good reasons for shifting […]

Thursday Review: “Medical Humanities: Some Uses and Problems”

It’s been said that according to TV, there are only two interesting professions: law enforcement and medicine. Police dramas, mysteries, procedurals, and courtroom shows are nearly limitless. On the other hand, medical shows ranging from melodrama to comedy to documentary are easy to come by. The commercial success and wide range of even fictional stories […]

Thursday Review: “Suffering and the Goals of Medicine”

We have a consciously dualistic view of ourselves. The mind and the body are separate things. One is subjective, the other is objective. One is a source of psychological “suffering” and the other is a source of biomedical “pain”. If this is true, how can healthcare professionals—specifically those in medical fields—have any responsibility to their […]

Thursday Review: “Slowing Down Fast Thinking to Enhance Understanding”

Daniel Kahneman and Amos Tversky more or less invented what we now call Behavioral Economics. Tversky passed away in 1996, but Kahneman went on to win the Nobel Prize and his 2011 bestseller, Thinking, Fast and Slow, brought their work to the general public. The big question Kahneman continuously answers in the book is, “How […]

Thursday Review: “Physician Views on Practicing Professionalism in the Corporate Age”

In a previous Thursday Review focusing on Burnout, Deborah Lathrop1 emphasized the necessity for healthcare providers to have a space to to address any pain from hidden grief. Lathrop’s discussion of disenfranchised grief is sensible, considering the changes in medicine in the last 30 years. The question, then, once we know the importance of acknowledging […]