Thursday Review: “Physician and Nursing Perceptions Concerning Interprofessional Communication and Collaboration”

There is no single profession which can meet all patients’ needs, Vasiliki Matziou et al. begin. The authors later explain it’s quite the opposite: when healthcare professionals collaborate, there are better health outcomes, higher patient satisfaction, and lower costs.1, 2

This much is known, but what influences how well nurses and physicians communicate? What exactly does each side feel they bring to each other?

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Thursday Review: “Teaching communication skills to clinical students”

In a section of the BMJ under the header How To Do It, Ian Christopher McManus, Charles A. Vincent, S. Thom, and Jane Kidd offer practical advice from their experiences teaching communications to students at St. Mary’s Hospital Medical School.

I’m certainly not running a medical school, but there are still some interesting, practical ideas to be gleaned from the authors’ experiences.
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Thursday Review: “Relationships of power: implications for interprofessional education”

Teaching health care providers how to collaborate between disciplines is considered an important mechanism for enhancing communication and interprofessional practice (IPP) among professionals, optimizing staff participation in clinical decision making, and improving the delivery of patient care1, 2, write Lindsay Baker, Eileen Egan-Lee, Maria Athina “Tina” Martimianakis and Scott Reeves.

Their article in the Journal of Interprofessional Care answers a big, glaring question: if there are such big advantages to “interprofessional practice”, why can it be so difficult to get professionals in different areas to collaborate?
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