Thursday Review: “Beyond ‘Dr. Feel-Good’: A Role for the Humanities in Medical Education”

As Dr. Arno K. Kumagai confirms in Academic Medicine, there’s a growing interest in the arts and humanities as a part of medical education. This curriculum, though, is still in its infancy. We know this because faculty and students alike don’t quite know what to do with the humanities.

Thursday Review: “The Power of Story: Narrative Inquiry as a Methodology in Nursing Research”

The advancement of knowledge in the natural sciences has an ideal form. Every secondary school curriculum includes lessons about the scientific method. The authors Wang and Geale remind us that that nursing specifically, and healthcare generally, is what happens when the advancement of this knowledge meets real people. Healthcare is full of dynamic processes characterized […]

Thursday Review: “Patients’ unvoiced agendas in general practice consultations: qualitative study”

In the discussions about how to bring the humanities into medicine, one essential feature often gets lost. The attempts to make care more human and more humane aren’t being done for the sake of warm fuzzies. There are concrete ways medical outcomes suffer when healthcare practitioners and patients aren’t communicating well. Writing in The BMJ, […]

Thursday Review: “Performing Narrative Medicine”

I was initially interested in Kristin M. Langellier’s article because of the idea of performance. The main project of my work in medical storytelling has been to take the ideas bound up in Narrative Medicine and apply them to face-to-face interaction. With Narrative Medicine, my concern has always been that narrative skills are often parallel […]